Category Archives: Powershell

Monitoring In-Memory OLTP Resource Pools

For databases that contain memory-optimized data, it’s considered a best practice to create a separate resource pool that limits memory consumption for memory-optimized objects. If you don’t use use Resource Governor to constrain the amount of memory allocated to memory-optimized objects, it’s possible that the buffer pool will respond to memory pressure, shrink, and performance for traditional/on-disk tables will be impacted (using Resource Governor also allows you to track memory consumption specific to that database). We must carefully monitor the amount of memory used by the resource pool, and respond when it goes beyond a certain threshold. If we don’t, then we can reach an out-of-memory condition (OOM).

This blog post details the various approaches I considered.

Option 1

SQL Agent Performance Condition Alerts can respond to changes on the “Resource Pool Stats” object. This gets us pretty close to the stated goal, but unfortunately you have to hard code a threshold value for “Used memory (KB)”. If you needed to deploy this type of monitoring on many servers, and over time some of them upgrade physical memory, you have to remember to go back and adjust the hard-coded value for the new threshold. I was hoping to be able to evaluate this as a percentage of “Target Memory (KB)”, and then alert above x%, but that doesn’t seem to be possible with Performance Condition Alerts.

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Option 2

SQL Server Event Alerts can take action when a specific error number occurs. I checked sys.sysmessages for references to the word ‘pool’, but as far as I can tell, none of them allow you to proactively respond to memory conditions before you run out of memory. We have errors like:

  • Disallowing page allocations for database ‘%.*ls’ due to insufficient memory in the resource pool ‘%ls’.
  • There is insufficient memory in the resource pool ‘%ls’ to run this operation on memory-optimized tables.
  • There is insufficient system memory in resource pool ‘%ls’ to run this query.

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Option 3

Another possibility would be to have a TSQL Agent job that constantly polls sys.dm_os_performance_counters:

This would allow you to calculate the ratio you want to alert on, and then send an email. I like this approach for its simplicity, but you’d have to compare the value of cntr_value for two different rows to calculate the percentage.

Option 4

I looked into WMI, and the documentation is pretty bad about exactly what’s supported for SQL Server. I was surprised to find that the class I needed was part of root\cimv2, not in the SQL Server branch. Note that there can be security issues with accessing WMI, so that might be a concern for your environment.

query 1

That’s good, but you’d then have to calculate the percentage manually.

query 2

Query 2 does exactly what we need:

No matter how much memory is assigned to the pool, it calculates the percentage that’s used. If the value of Used memory exceeds a pre-defined percentage of Target memory, you might send an email, write to the SQL Errorlog (and then notify based on that error number), or use other options for logging and notification.

SQL Server log shipping within the AWS Cloud

Much of what you see in the blogosphere pertaining to log shipping and AWS references an on-premise server as part of the topology. I searched far and wide for any information about how to setup log shipping between AWS VMs, but found very little. However, I have a client that does business solely within AWS, and needed a solution for HA/DR that did not include on-premise servers.

Due to network latency issues and disaster recovery requirements (the log shipping secondary server must reside in a separate AWS region), it was decided to have the Primary server push transaction logs to S3, and the Secondary server pull from S3. On the Primary, log shipping would occur as usual, backing up to a local share, with a separate SQL Agent job responsible for copying the transaction log backups to S3. Amazon has created a set of Powershell functionality embodied in AWS Tools for Windows Powershell, which can be downloaded here. One could argue that Amazon RDS might solve some of the HA/DR issues that this client faced, but it was deemed too restrictive.

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S3 quirks

When files are written to S3, the date and time of when the file was last modified is not retained. That means when the Secondary server polls S3 for files to copy, it cannot rely on the date/time from S3. Also, it is not possible to set the LastModified value on S3 files. Instead, a list of S3 file name must be generated, and compared to files that reside on the Secondary. If the S3 file does not reside locally, it must be copied.

Credentials – AWS Authentication

AWS supports different methods of authentication:

  1. IAM roles (details here)
  2. profiles (details here)

From an administrative perspective, I don’t have and don’t want access to the client’s AWS administratove console. Additionally, I needed a solution that I could easily test and modify without involving the client. For this reason, I chose an authentication solution based on AWS profiles that are stored within the Windows environment, for a specific Windows account (in case you’re wondering, the profiles are encrypted).

Windows setup

  • create a Windows user named SQLAgentCmdProxy
  • create a password for the SQLAgentCmdProxy account (you will need this later)

The SQLAgentCmdProxy Windows account will be used as a proxy in for SQL Agent job steps, which will execute Powershell scripts. (NOTE: if you change the drive letters and or folder names, you will need to update the scripts in this post)

from a cmd prompt, execute the following:

Powershell setup

(The scripts in this blog post should be run on the Secondary log shipping server, but with very little effort, they can be modified to run on the Primary and push transaction log backups to S3.)

The following scripts assume you already have an S3 bucket that contains one or more transaction log files that you want to copy to the Secondary server (they must have the extension “trn”, otherwise you will need to change -Match “trn” in the script below). Change the bucket name to match your bucket, and if required, also change the name of the region. Depending on the security configuration for your server, you may also need to execute “Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned” in a Powershell prompt as a Windows Administrator, prior to executing any Powershell scripts.

After installing AWS Tools for Windows Powershell, create a new Powershell script with the following commands

Be sure to fill in your AccessKey and SecretKey values in the script above, then save the script as C:\Powershell\Setup.ps1. When this script is executed, it will establish an AWS environment based on the proxy for the SQL Agent job step.

The next step is to create a new Powershell script with the following commands:

Again you should substitute your bucket and region names in the script above. Note that after the files are copied to the Secondary, the LastModifiedTime is updated based on the file name (log shipping uses the UTC format when naming transaction log backups). Save the Powershell script as C:\powershell\CopyS3TRNToLocal.ps1

SQL Server setup

  • create a login for the SQLAgentCmdProxy Windows account (for our purposes, we will make this account a member of the sysadmin role, but you should not do that in your production environment)
  • create a credential named TlogCopyFromS3Credential, mapped to SQLAgentCmdProxy (you will need the password for SQLAgentCmdProxy in order to accomplish this)
  • create a SQL Agent job
  • create a job step, Type: Operating System (CmdExec), Runas: TlogCopyFromS3Credential

Script for the above steps

  • Change references to <DomainName> to be your domain or local server name, and save the script
  • Execute the job
  • Open the job and navigate to the job step. In the Command window, change the name of the Powershell script from Setup.ps1 to CopyS3TRNToLocal.ps1
  • Execute the job
  • Verify the contents of the C:\Backups\logs folder – you should now see the file(s) from your S3 bucket

Troubleshooting credentials

If you see errors for the job that resemble this:

InitializeDefaultsCmdletGet-S3Object : No credentials specified or obtained from persisted/shell defaults.

then recheck the AccessKey and SecretKey values that you ran in the Setup.ps1 script. If you find errors in either of those keys, you’ll need to rerun the Setup.ps1 file (change the name of the file to be executed in the SQL Agent job, and re-run the job). If you don’t find any errors in the AccessKey or SecretKey values, you might have luck with creating the AWS profile for the proxy account manually (my results with this approach have been mixed). Since profiles are specific to a Windows user, we can use runas /user:SQLAgentCmdProxy powershell_ise.exe to launch the Powershell ISE, and then execute the code from Setup.ps1.

You can verify that the Powershell environment uses the SQL proxy account by temporarily adding $env:USERNAME to the script.

S3 Maintenance

When you setup log shipping on the Primary or Secondary, you can specify the retention period, but S3 file maintenance needs to be a bit more hands on. The following script handles purging local and S3 files with the extension “trn” that are more than 30 days old, based on UTC file name.

Save the script, and create a SQL Agent job to execute it. You’ll also have to reference the proxy account as in the prior SQL Agent job.

Don’t forget

If you use log shipping between AWS VMs as outlined in this post, you will need to disable/delete the SQL Agent copy jobs on the Primary and Secondary servers.

Disaster Recovery

All log shipping described here occurs within the AWS cloud. An alternative would be to ship transaction logs to a separate storage service (that does not use S3), or a completely separate cloud. At the time of this writing, this blog post by David Bermingham clearly describes many of the issues and resources associated with HA/DR in AWS.

“Hope is not a strategy”

HA/DR strategies require careful planning and thorough testing. In order to save money, some AWS users may be tempted to create a Secondary instance with small memory and CPU requirements, hoping to be able to resize the Secondary when failover is required. For patching, the ‘”resize it when we need it” approach might work, but for Disaster Recovery it can be fatal. Be forewarned that Amazon does not guarantee the ability to start an instance of a specific size, in a specific availability zone/region, unless the instance is reserved. If the us-east region has just gone down, everyone with Disaster Recovery instances in other AWS regions will attempt to launch them. As a result, it is likely that some of those who are desperately trying to resize and then launch their unreserved Disaster Recovery instances in the new region will receive the dreaded “InsufficientInstanceCapacity” error message from AWS. Even in my limited testing for this blog post, I encountered this error after resizing a t1-micro instance to r2.xlarge, and attempting to start the instance (this error persisted for at least 30 minutes, but the web is full of stories of people waiting multiple hours). You could try to launch a different size EC2 instance, but there is no guarantee you will have success (more details on InstanceCapacity can be found here).

The bottom line is that if you run a DR instance that is not reserved, at the precise moment you require more capacity it may be unavailable. That’s not the type of hassle you want when you’re in the middle of recovering from a disaster.

I am indebted to Mike Fal (b) for reviewing this post.